In the Wild with Greg Wagner


VISIT MULBERRY LANE by Greg Wagner
June 9, 2010, 1:20 pm
Filed under: Uncategorized, wild edibles | Tags: , ,

Gosh, I love to pick and eat mulberries. C’mon, who doesn’t, right? I guess it’s the Nebraska kid in me (and many of us) who like to do that!

Growing up on the western edge of Gretna, NE, my brothers and I would hike the nearby woods and seek out those mulberry trees with ripe fruit in early to mid June.

 I fondly recall the days of having purple feet, hands, lips and tongue. What a blast it was (and still is) to hit the woods and literally gorge yourself on the tart mulberries – even taking a few home to put on vanilla ice cream, too! Mmmm – good!

Please know that one of the things that my wife-Polly and I have done over the years with our kids, especially when they were young, is to take them on mulberry picking adventures. We enjoyed wonderful conversations while in the process of harvesting and eating those tart mulberries. It’s a neat thing to do to experience nature’s bounty with little or no interruption.

Now, enough nostalgia. Fast-forward to the present. Guess what? Yep, here in southeastern Nebraska  the mulberries are ripe!  So, round-up the kids, grab your pails and take to mulberry lane in your neck of the woods! What wonderful discussions you’ll have with your children. Just know the purple feet, hands, lips and tongue all come with a visit to mulberry lane!

See you out there, wanting a few more mulberries to put on my vanilla ice cream!

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2 Comments so far
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Keep your eyes open for a mulberry tree on the shores of your favorite fishing hole. There are a number of fish that will feed on those ripe mulberries that drop into the water. If you find a mulberry tree that branches out over the water you can bet there are some channel cats, common carp and probably a variety of other species there eating mulberries. Our hook & line state record bigmouth buffalo, a 64-pound fish, was taken on a mulberry!

Of course you can use the mulberries for bait, or if you are a fly-tier, you can tie up some fake mulberries, http://thesimontons.com/downloads/SimontonsIslandParkMulberryFlyRecipe.pdf .

Daryl Bauer
Fisheries Outreach Program Manager
Nebraska Game & Parks Commission
daryl.bauer@nebraska.gov
http://barbsandbacklashes.wordpress.com/

P.S. I love to eat mulberries too, but Greg always beats me to them. Look at his figure. Ha.

Comment by whitetips

Nice one, D.B., nice one! If only I could reach out just a bit further on some of those mulberry tree branches hanging over my favorite sandpit lake cove to get at those really plump, ripe mulberries. Hmmm. Better me to eat them than Bauer’s catfish and carp, right? Don’t worry folks, I’ll be wearing my life jacket. Snap. Whoaaaaa …. Splash!!!

“Wags” — Greg Wagner

Comment by Greg Wagner




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